Tuesday, April 12, 2016

TED-Ed Tuesday: Full STEAM Ahead

Is STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics) a focus in your school?  If so, you'll be excited to know that the TED-Ed library is a free resource filled with engaging, ready to use lessons.


Science


Technology



Engineering


Art

Mathematics






If you don't see what you're looking for in the existing TED-Ed library, create it using the TED-Ed's Lesson Platform.



Full STEAM Ahead!


Tuesday, April 5, 2016

TED-Ed Tuesday: How human can a robot be?

Dr. Dylan Ferniany, the author of today's post, is a fellow TED-Ed Innovative Educator and the Gifted and Talented Program Specialist in Birmingham Public Schools.  Today's blog is reposted from the Birmingham City Schools Gifted and Talented Education Program's blog.

What is the difference between a human and a robot? How close could a robot come to be a human? And as we wear more technology and mechanize ourselves- think FitBit, Google Glass, etc, are we becoming more robotic? 

Birmingham area student from Homewood Middle School's TED-Ed Club explores this topic in her talk "How human can a robot be?". This would be a great topic for an intellectual conversation with friends, or teachers could pose it as a dynamic class discussion about the potential implications of robotics in the future. Many robots are already doing jobs that humans once did, particularly in the manufacturing industry. What does this mean for the future of work? What skills are needed for careers in 2020 and beyond? 

Eliza explores the issue of emotions in robots and finds that ultimately robots do not experience feelings the way that humans do, but they can mimic them. A company called Affectiva is exploring emotion recognition in artificial intelligence so that computers can recognize human emotions by reading facial expressions. This fascinating field is merging the abilities of man and machine. Watch Eliza's TED-Ed Club talk to learn more. 



Tuesday, March 22, 2016

TED-Ed Tuesday: Becoming a better thinker

Dr. Dylan Ferniany, the author of today's post, is a fellow TED-Ed Innovative Educator and the Gifted and Talented Program Specialist in Birmingham Public Schools.  Today's blog is reposted from the Birmingham City Schools Gifted and Talented Education Program's blog.


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​         Everyone's always talking about critical and creative thinking- but what is it? How is it different than normal thinking? Did you know that the average adult makes approximately 35,000 decisions per day, and a young child makes 3,000 decisions per day. So most people are making somewhere between 3000 and 35000 decisions each day. That's a lot of decisions! Some of those decisions may be small, like whether to brush your teeth first or wash your face. But other decisions are much bigger and may take more of your mental energy. The way we think through those big decisions is by using critical and creative thinking skills. Here's an example: Your teacher gives you a project with a due date in two weeks. She has given you a rubric so you know the parameters, but she has left some decisions up to you. You may have to think about what supplies to get, what is the next step, where to find your information, how to present the information, and all kinds of other decisions you don't even realize you are making.
          Sometimes, we have to make decisions that may affect our future. For instance, which courses to take in high school, or where to go to college. These decisions are hard and take higher levels of thinking and planning than smaller decisions. So if we talk so much about it, how do we do it? Today's TED-Ed lesson explains 5 tips for improving your critical thinking skills. Watch the video, and then interact with the lesson on TED-Ed!

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Arthur Benjamin: The magic of Fibonacci numbers

The magic of Fibonacci numbers by: Arthur Benjamin


Materials and Resources



Tuesday, March 8, 2016

TED-Ed Tuesday: #TEDEdChat

Are you on Twitter?  Did you know there is a Twitter chat all about the awesomeness that is TED and TED-Ed? Every Tuesday at 6:00 pm EST, follow #TEDEdChat on Twitter and join in the conversation.

The weekly chat is inspired by one of the countless talks or lessons.  Each #TEDEdChat is a co-hosted by @TED_Ed and anyone who has an idea worth mulling. The only prerequisite is that you have participated in a past chat.

Today's chat is Linda Liukas' talk, A Delightful Way to Teach Kids About Computers.  Watch the talk and join the chat.  (Or don't watch the talk and join the chat.  Either way, you are welcome!)




Do you have an idea for a #TEDEdChat?  Email steph.ng@ted.com for the chance to co-host.

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

TED-Ed Tuesday: Boost Your Confidence

Dr. Dylan Ferniany, the author of today's post, is a fellow TED-Ed Innovative Educator and the Gifted and Talented Program Specialist in Birmingham Public Schools.  Today's blog is reposted from the Birmingham City Schools Gifted and Talented Education Program's blog.

"Have you ever been told to be more confident? I know I have. Confidence can be a key factor in success and career but it can sometimes be hard to find. The good news is that we can make ourselves more confident! You will learn how in this TED-Ed Lesson. Learn how a fixed and growth mindset may help or hurt your confidence. Confidence also comes from your ability to fail and experience setbacks. If you can accept that you will sometimes make mistakes, you will be more confident going in to the situation. Take the TED-Ed Lesson on 3 Tips to Boost Your Confidence, and then practice it when you have the next opportunity to take on a challenging task!"



Tuesday, February 16, 2016

TED-Ed Tuesday: The Future Today

How do you get kids to be innovative?  You let them. You get out of their way. -Nicholas Provenzano from the TED-Ed Blog

Ishita Katyal's parents know this secret, and she has been busy!  At the age of ten, she is a published author and has spoken on three TED stages.  The first was TEDxBhilwara and the talk was titled, "Why You Don't have to Wait Until You Grow Up."  My daughters and I watched the talk together, and my youngest was so impressed that she requested to read her book, Simran's Diary.  We ordered it, and she enjoyed the book.  

Then, a few months later, Ishita was brought to the TEDYouth stage in New York to deliver the same talk.  I was lucky enough to be in attendance and even got Ishita's autograph for my daughter.  



And when TED was figuring out how to kick off this year's conference, whom did they ask? Ishita! Last night, she kicked off TED 2016 with a new talk.  Ishita challenged adults by saying, "Instead of asking children what they want to do when they grow up, you should ask them what they want to be right now."

And then get out of their way.